Summer 2018: English Courses

05/07/2018 - 05/25/2018 (Maymester 3-week)

(CRN 60492) EH 207-01: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, Maximum enrollment: 30, ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Chad Thomas

"Love hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire.

(CRN 60495) EH 208-01: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, Maximum enrollment: 30, ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Joe Conway

Few literary works have had as much impact on modern culture than Mary Shelley’s 1818 masterpiece, Frankenstein. In this online class we will immerse ourselves in the monstrous legacy of Shelley’s classic and the many stories, films, and tv shows it has inspired. We will read stories of mad scientists by masters of the weird like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, H.P. Lovecraft, and Philip K. Dick. We’ll also watch and respond to the films Frankenstein (1931) and Blade Runner (1982), as well as episodes from classic television shows like The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The course will consider the many contexts that have influenced Frankenstein stories over the years, including a survey of cultural movements like romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism, political movements like anarchism, feminism, and social Darwinism, and formal genres like the nineteenth-century gothic, the Victorian adventure yarn, German Expressionist film, and cyberpunk.

 

05/29/2018 - 06/29/2018 (1st 5-week)

(CRN 60489) EH 101-02: COLLEGE WRITING I, Maximum enrollment: 23   MTWR  10:20AM-12:20 PM

Instructor: Dr. Colleen Weir

(CRN 60494) EH 207-03: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, Maximum enrollment: 30, ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Joseph Taylor

Monsters continue to appear everywhere in our lives, whether in the many zombie apocalypses on film and television, in the numerous villains we encounter or create in our gaming software, or, more frightening, in the atrocious acts of global politics, terrorism, and war witnessed through news and social media. In this course, we will explore the topic of the monster in ancient and medieval texts, including epic poems, Greek tragedies, comic fabliaux, and sober historical chronicles. We will think about human identity and monstrosity, and we will examine traditional monsters (werewolves, witches, etc.), as well as the concept of monstrousness and animality via the so-called monstrous races of the ancient and medieval periods (Jews and Saracens) and hybrid creatures (hybrid races, hybrid monsters, hybrid animals). We will question how and why our ideas of the monster shape and govern what we take to be normal/abnormal within our cultures, religions, and even our politics. Our texts will include The Epic of Gilgamesh, Oedipus Tyrannus, Beowulf, the Canterbury Tales.

(CRN 60507) EH 412-01: SS: WORLD BUILDING, Maximum enrollment: 15, MTWR 10:20AM-12:20 PM

(CRN 60508) EH 512-01: SS: WORLD BUILDING, Maximum enrollment: 10, MTWR 10:20AM-12:20 PM

Instructor: Dr. Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli

World-Building and Imaginative Writing: This course’s primary goal is to help writers create better imaginary (or constructed) worlds for narrative media—whether those writers choose to work in game design, film, comic, or traditional literary forms. We will read and analyze classic and contemporary short stories, novels, and scripts to discover the techniques used to create vivid, unforgettable worlds. Students will primarily be allowed to write in the genres (science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, horror, literary fiction, etc.) and forms of their choosing, so if you have a novel you’ve been dying to write or a game you’ve been wanting to design, this is the course for you. Readings will include Jeff Vandermeer’s Wonderbook and may include works by Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, E. M. Forster, Philip K. Dick, Jorge Luis Borges, Ursula Le Guin, Neil Gaiman, V. E. Schwab, Karen Russell, N.K. Jemisin, Philip Pullman, Charlie Jane Anders, and others.

 

05/29/2018 - 08/03/2018 (Full Term)

(CRN 60488) EH 101-01: COLLEGE WRITING I, Maximum enrollment: 23, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Michael McGinnis

(CRN 60490) EH 102-01: COLLEGE WRITING II, Maximum enrollment: 23, MW 10:20AM-12:20 PM, Instructor: Heather Cross

(CRN 60491) EH 102-02: COLLEGE WRITING II, Maximum enrollment: 23, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Julie Naviaux

(CRN 60493) EH 207-02: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, Maximum enrollment: 30, ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Joshua “Seth” Lee

When was the last time something you read made you stop and think? Perhaps it was an article in The New York Times or a recent, bestselling autobiography of a major world leader. The value of such writing is easy to assess. It’s current and topical, helping us navigate and understand recent events. What about something much older? What value could the 4,000 year old Epic of Gilgamesh have to us in the 21st century, except as a historical artifact, a remnant from a time and culture long past? This course introduces you to literature of the ancient world through the Age of Discovery, roughly 2100 BCE-1700 CE, in hopes of answering such a question. We will experience the historical and literary distinctiveness of a variety of cultures – Egyptian, Greek, European, Middle Eastern, English, and Indian – and explore in them things that they share, human experiences that cross ethnic and geographical lines. You’ll also learn the basic vocabulary of literary studies, to read actively, and write critically. Literary studies encourage you to think differently than you’re likely used to, and engage a different part of your brain. Literature often asks us to ponder unanswerable questions and wrestle with problems as old as our species.

(CRN 60496) EH 208-02: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, Maximum enrollment: 30, ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Jim Coby

In this section of English 208 we will chart the trajectory of comics and graphic narratives “from underground to everywhere” (to borrow Hillary Chute’s phrase). Beginning with Rodolphe Töpffer’s sketches and William Blake’s illustrated poetry, we will interrogate questions of both form and content of these works, paying close attention to cultural and political influences on the “invisible art” of these works. Readings to include Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Lynda Barry’s One! Hundred! Demons! Alan Moore’s Watchmen, John Lewis’ March, and selections from Frederic Wertham’s polemic Seduction of the Innocent in addition to other readings.

EH 300: STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS WRIT'G (Semester Hours: 3). Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required. Prerequisite: EH 102 or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 20.

(CRN 60498) EH 300-01, ONLINE, Instructor: Sinceree Gunn

(CRN 60499) EH 300-02, ONLINE, Instructor: Allen Berry

(CRN 60500) EH 300-03, ONLINE, Instructor: Allen Berry

 

EH 301: TECHNICAL WRITING (Semester Hours: 3). Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation. Qualifies as elective in English major. Does not count toward English minor except Cognate Studies in Technical Writing. Junior Standing. Prerequisite: EH 102 or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 20.

(CRN 60501) EH 301-01, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Joy Robinson

(CRN 60502) EH 301-02, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Joy Robinson

(CRN 60503) EH 301-03, ONLINE, Instructor: Sinceree Gunn

(CRN 60505) EH 301-04, MW 12:40PM-2:30 AM, Instructor: Dorothy Weems

 

(CRN 60506) EH 320-01: PRACTICUM IN WRITING, Maximum enrollment: 5, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Ryan Weber

(CRN 60509) EH 602-01: PRACTICUM/TECHNICAL COMM, Maximum enrollment: 1, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Ryan Weber

 

07/02/2018 - 08/03/2018 (2nd 5-week)

(CRN 60497) EH 242-01: MYTHOLOGY, Maximum enrollment: 30, ONLINE

Instructor: Dr. Laurel Bollinger

Some of the most important stories humans have ever told themselves are now described as myths—stories that wrestle with the nature of being human, with life and death, and with our relation to the world. In other words, myth traditions explore the very concept of the sacred as it has been understood through human history. This course will visit sacred narratives from around the world, including Greece and Rome, Mesopotamia, Nordic countries, MesoAmerica, Africa, and North America. Myth continues to have a grip on the human imagination. Let’s think about why! (Course counts toward WGS Minor and toward Charger Foundations)

 

FAQ

COLLEGE WRITING: There are two courses in the composition sequence. EH 101 (or 101S with 101L Writing Studio, based on placement) and EH 102. Some students may have the option to take EH 103 or EH 105 in lieu of the sequence, again based on placement.

EH 101: COLLEGE WRITING I (Semester Hours: 3). Introduction to academic writing, critical reading, and rhetorical knowledge.

EH 102: COLLEGE WRITING II (Semester Hours: 3). Intermediate academic writing. Focuses on research questions and techniques, as well as critical engagement with published and student texts. Prerequisite: EH 101 or 101S.

EH 207: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102 or EH 105.

EH 208: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE II (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102 or EH 105.

 

For more information, contact the English Department at eh@uah.edu or 256.824.6320.