Summer 2019: English Courses

Maymester (3-week)
05/06/2019 - 05/24/2019

CRN 60492 EH 207 01 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire

CRN 60495 EH 208 01 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE II, ONLINE, Dr. Joseph Conway

CRN 60893 EH 208 03 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE II, ONLINE, Dr. Joseph Conway

 

1st 5-week Summer courses
05/28/2019 - 06/26/2019

CRN 61132 EH 207 04 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Joseph Taylor
Monsters! This course will explore literary monsters of all sorts. Through the monster, we will explore modes of normative identity set against the abnormal and the monstrous. We will examine how these texts, and the cultures that produced them, establish and/or call into question various political, religious, and cultural systems from ancient times to the seventeenth century. We will question how and why our ideas of the monster shape and govern our own normative models and how movement across diverse cultural spaces destabilizes these models in profound moments of cultural contact. Our main texts for this course will include the ancient Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, the fifth-century BCE drama Oedipus Tyrannus, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, the fourteenth-century Middle English poems Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Canterbury Tales, the sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes, and Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, among other texts.

 

Full Term (10-week)
05/28/2019 - 08/01/2019

CRN 60488 101 01 COLLEGE WRITING I, ONLINE, Dr. Michael McGinnis

CRN 60490 EH 102 01 COLLEGE WRITING II, MW 10:20AM 12:20PM, CTC 126B, Heather Cross

CRN 60491 EH 102 02 COLLEGE WRITING II, ONLINE, Dr. Julie Naviaux

CRN 60493 EH 207 02 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Joseph Taylor
Monsters! This course will explore literary monsters of all sorts. Through the monster, we will explore modes of normative identity set against the abnormal and the monstrous. We will examine how these texts, and the cultures that produced them, establish and/or call into question various political, religious, and cultural systems from ancient times to the seventeenth century. We will question how and why our ideas of the monster shape and govern our own normative models and how movement across diverse cultural spaces destabilizes these models in profound moments of cultural contact. Our main texts for this course will include the ancient Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, the fifth-century BCE drama Oedipus Tyrannus, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, the fourteenth-century Middle English poems Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Canterbury Tales, the sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes, and Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, among other texts.

CRN 60494 EH 207 03 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire

CRN 60496 208 02 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, ONLINE, Dr. Colleen Noletto
“Between You and Me”: This course will explore interpersonal relationships—between friends, partners, families, and professionals—as presented by a variety of authors in multiple genres from the seventeenth century to the present. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their respective historical, social and philosophical contexts. Authors may include Austen, Chekov, Morrison, Ishiguro, Lahiri, Eliot, O’Connor, and Marquez, among others.

W CRN 60497 EH 242 01 MYTHOLOGY, ONLINE, Dr. Laurel Bollinger
Some of the most important stories humans have ever told themselves are now described as myths—stories that wrestle with the nature of being human, with life and death, and with our relation to the world. In other words, myth traditions explore the very concept of the sacred as it has been explored through human history. This course will visit sacred narratives from around the world, including Greece and Rome, Mesopotamia, Nordic countries, Mesoamerica, Africa, and North America. Myth continues to have a grip on the human imagination. Let’s think about why! (Course counts toward WGS Minor and toward Charger Foundations)

Y CRN 60498 EH 300 01 STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS WRIT'G, TR 12:40PM 02:40PM, LIB 207, Sinceree Gunn

CRN 60499 EH 300 02 STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS WRIT'G, ONLINE, Dr. Allen Berry

CRN 60500 EH 300 03 STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS WRIT'G, ONLINE, Dr. Allen Berry

CRN 60501 EH 301 01 TECHNICAL WRITING, ONLINE, Dr. Joy Robinson

CRN 60502 EH 301 02 TECHNICAL WRITING, ONLINE, Dr. Joy Robinson

Y CRN 60503 EH 301 03 TECHNICAL WRITING, TR 10:20AM 12:20PM, LIB 207, Sinceree Gunn

CRN 60505 EH 301 04 TECHNICAL WRITING, MW 12:40PM 02:40PM, LIB 207, STAFF

CRN 60506 EH 320 01 PRACTICUM IN WRITING, Dr. Ryan Weber

W CRN 61135 414 01 CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, MW 10:20AM 12:20PM, CTC 127, Dr. Rebecca Hazelwood
Did you know that nonfiction could be creative? Did you know that nonfiction could be more than dry biographies of presidents, that it can be exciting and weird and informative and--yes--personal? This is a creative nonfiction workshop class, so that means we'll be writing and workshopping a variety of our pieces that we write, ranging from short shorts (flash nonfiction) to personal essays (think: essays about teeth, or hummingbirds, or tattoos) to memoir (which is not simple autobiography; it's a true story, well told). We might detour into true crime and nature writing (and maybe other subjects), too. There will be some reading involved, so that you have models of the types of essays we're writing, but the goal is to write creative (exciting!) true things and get feedback in the workshop model.

CRN 61137 EH 440 01 SS: PROPOSAL WRITING, ONLINE, Dr. Ryan Weber

GRADUATE-LEVEL

W CRN 61138 EH 514 01 CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, MW 10:20AM 12:20PM, CTC 127, Dr. Rebecca Hazelwood
Did you know that nonfiction could be creative? Did you know that nonfiction could be more than dry biographies of presidents, that it can be exciting and weird and informative and--yes--personal? This is a creative nonfiction workshop class, so that means we'll be writing and workshopping a variety of our pieces that we write, ranging from short shorts (flash nonfiction) to personal essays (think: essays about teeth, or hummingbirds, or tattoos) to memoir (which is not simple autobiography; it's a true story, well told). We might detour into true crime and nature writing (and maybe other subjects), too. There will be some reading involved, so that you have models of the types of essays we're writing, but the goal is to write creative (exciting!) true things and get feedback in the workshop model.

CRN 61139 EH 540 01 SS: PROPOSAL WRITING, ONLINE, Dr. Ryan Weber

CRN 60509 EH 602 01 PRACTICUM/TECHNICAL COMM, Dr. Ryan Weber

CRN 61140 EH 631 01 STUDY AM LIT SINCE 1865, ONLINE, Dr. Laurel Bollinger
Joining the Conversation: This course is designed to increase your mastery of skills in reading and analyzing American literature at the professional level, focused on shorter works of American literature since the Civil War. We will examine the literary movements of Realism, Naturalism, and Modernism, with the aim of enabling students to join the critical conversation among professional scholars.

 

For more information, contact the English Department at eh@uah.edu or 256.824.6320.