General Education Requirements in English

Students can take several courses offered by the English Department to fulfill their Area II (Humanities and Fine Arts) General Education Requirements (Charger Foundations):

EH 207
Readings in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 208
Readings in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.
EH 242
Mythology - Archetypal, metaphorical, and historical significance of deities and myths. (Counts as EH 207 in the lit sequence.)
or
EH 209
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 210
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.

Although any EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 or 208/210 section will fulfill Area II requirements, the sections offered each semester will have specific themes and contents from which students can choose.

Spring 2020: EH 200-Level Courses

EH 207: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102, EH 103, or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 35 per section.

(CRN 10992) EH 207-01 with William Taylor
Monsters! This course will explore literary monsters of all sorts. Through the monster, we will explore modes of normative identity set against the abnormal and the monstrous. We will examine how these texts, and the cultures that produced them, establish and/or call into question various political, religious, and cultural systems from ancient times to the seventeenth century. We will question how and why our ideas of the monster shape and govern our own normative models and how movement across diverse cultural spaces destabilizes these models in profound moments of cultural contact. Our main texts for this course will include the ancient Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, the fifth-century BCE drama Oedipus Tyrannus, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, the fourteenth-century Middle English poems Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Canterbury Tales, the sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes, and Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, among other texts.

(CRN 10922) EH 207-02 with Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.

O (CRN 10923) EH 207-03 with Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire.

O (CRN 10924) EH 207-04 with Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire.

O (CRN 10925) EH 207-05 with Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
Love in Ancient to Early Modern Literature. This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. In particular, we will be examining literary representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

O (CRN 10926) EH 207-06 with William Taylor
Monsters! This course will explore literary monsters of all sorts. Through the monster, we will explore modes of normative identity set against the abnormal and the monstrous. We will examine how these texts, and the cultures that produced them, establish and/or call into question various political, religious, and cultural systems from ancient times to the seventeenth century. We will question how and why our ideas of the monster shape and govern our own normative models and how movement across diverse cultural spaces destabilizes these models in profound moments of cultural contact. Our main texts for this course will include the ancient Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, the fifth-century BCE drama Oedipus Tyrannus, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, the fourteenth-century Middle English poems Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Canterbury Tales, the sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes, and Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, among other texts.

O (CRN 10927) EH 207-07: with Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire.

O (CRN 10928) EH 207-08 with Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
Love in Ancient to Early Modern Literature. This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. In particular, we will be examining literary representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

O (CRN 10929) EH 207-09 with Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
Love in Ancient to Early Modern Literature. This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. In particular, we will be examining literary representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

(CRN 13059) EH 207-10 with Jeffrey Nelson
Love in the Western World:  Euripides’ Medea, Virgil’s The Aeneid, Marie de France’s Lais, Chaucer’s “The Miller’s Tale” and “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale,” Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, and lyrics by Veronica Franco and other women of the Italian Renaissance.

W (CRN 11023) EH 242-01: MYTHOLOGY with Laurel Bollinger
W (CRN 11024) EH 242-02: MYTHOLOGY with Laurel Bollinger
Some of the most important stories humans have ever told ourselves are now labeled myths—stories that wrestle with the nature of being human, with life and death, and with our relation to the world. In other words, myth traditions explore the very concept of the sacred as it has been explored through human history. This course will visit sacred narratives from around the world, including Greece and Rome, Mesopotamia, Nordic countries, MesoAmerica, Africa, and North America. Myth continues to have a grip on the human imagination. Let’s think about why!

 

EH 208: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE II (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102, EH 103, or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 35 per section.

O (CRN 10937) EH 208-01 with Scott Hopkins
Science fiction offers lessons and insights into the challenges of tomorrow. Frankenstein warns as much about genetic recombination as it does about re-animating corpses or "playing God." Brave New World warns about too much happiness and consumer culture, as well as larger political questions about structuring society. 1984 and The Handmaid's Tale warn us into thinking about individual rights, and the slippery slope to losing individuality in times of catastrophic change, while Neuromancer sheds light onto the role of machines and identity as the future melds online, and explores "flesh" and "mind" and "sentience" and "freedom." Read and write about tomorrow through the lens of yesterday.

(CRN 10938) EH 208-02 with Joseph Conway
Few literary works have had as much impact on modern culture than Mary Shelley’s 1818 masterpiece, Frankenstein. In this class we will immerse ourselves in the monstrous legacy of Shelley’s classic and the many cultural products it has inspired. Readings may include stories of mad scientists by old masters of the weird like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, and H.P. Lovecraft, as well as classic Yiddish tales featuring the Golem of Prague, an "artificial man" who in Eastern European Jewish folk lore saves his people from Anti-Semitic persecution. More contemporary materials might encompass the steampunk stories of Ted Chiang, 2017 Nobel Prize winner Kasuo Ishiguro’s heartbreaking "clone memoir" Never Let Me Go, Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi’s dark, absurdist tale of war and memory Frankenstein in Baghdad, and graphic novelist Victor Lavalle’s Destroyer, a story focused on the monstrous legacy of racism in America from slavery times to the age of Black Lives Matter. We’ll also watch and respond to the films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), as well as episodes from classic television shows like The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The course will consider the many contexts that have influenced Frankenstein stories over the years, including the politics of feminism, anarchism, imperialism, and anti-racism; a survey of cultural movements like romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism; and formal genres like the Gothic tale, the Victorian adventure yarn, and German Expressionist film.

(CRN 10939) EH 208-03 with Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies.” Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

O (CRN 10942) EH 208-04 with James Coby
Lock your doors! Hide your loved ones! Cover all innocent ears and eyes! Our course this semester will examine several important literary works that have been banned or challenged in one fashion or another. Whether in high schools, local communities, or on the national levels, each of these texts has been deemed shocking, morally reprehensible, or otherwise offensive by some community. In this course, we will explore these texts for their literary value, excavate subtextual and subversive meanings, and examine the contexts of their publications and subsequent bans. Surprisingly (or perhaps unsurprisingly), it’s very often the issues that authors are attempting to address (violence, sex, feeling ostracized) that lead to their being banned. Through it all, we will keep a focus on crafting strong arguments using evidence from these texts and outside resources to make our points.

(CRN 10940) EH 208-05 with  STAFF

O (CRN 10943) EH 208-06 with Colleen Noletto
“Between You and Me”: This course will explore interpersonal relationships—between friends, partners, families, and professionals—as presented by a variety of authors in multiple genres from the seventeenth century to the present. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their respective historical, social and philosophical contexts. Authors may include Austen, Chekov, Morrison, Ishiguro, Lahiri, Eliot, O’Connor, and Marquez, among others.

O (CRN 10952) EH 208-07 with Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
Identity in Literature. In this course, we will investigate the ways in which various social identities are created through language and texts, and particularly how various categories of identity (e.g. race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality) are central to the study of texts. Specifically, we’ll consider some of the following questions and the various speculative answers that have been offered to them: How do human beings come to acquire a sense of an individual, personal identity—or, rather, identities? Are those identities inventions—constructions that are mutable and contingent? Are those identities essential—inherent to the individual and unchanging? What are some of the elements that comprise those identities? How do representations contribute to our sense of our own identities, as well as the identities of others? How do those representations help to enforce—or to challenge—relations of power among social groups? How do we read texts—what critical strategies can we employ—when we read with an eye to identity? Readings will include Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Tommy Orange's There There, Tsitsi Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions, and works by Jhumpa Lahiri, Eliza Haywood, Sylvia Plath, Garrard Conley, and more.

O (CRN 10953) EH 208-08 with Holly Jones
"The Empire Writes (Back)": Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.

O (CRN 10954) EH 208-09 with Scott Hopkins
Science fiction offers lessons and insights into the challenges of tomorrow. Frankenstein warns as much about genetic recombination as it does about re-animating corpses or "playing God." Brave New World warns about too much happiness and consumer culture, as well as larger political questions about structuring society. 1984 and The Handmaid's Tale warn us into thinking about individual rights, and the slippery slope to losing individuality in times of catastrophic change, while Neuromancer sheds light onto the role of machines and identity as the future melds online, and explores "flesh" and "mind" and "sentience" and "freedom." Read and write about tomorrow through the lens of yesterday.

O (CRN 10955) EH 208-10 with Joseph Conway
Few literary works have had as much impact on modern culture than Mary Shelley’s 1818 masterpiece, Frankenstein. In this class we will immerse ourselves in the monstrous legacy of Shelley’s classic and the many cultural products it has inspired. Readings may include stories of mad scientists by old masters of the weird like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, and H.P. Lovecraft, as well as classic Yiddish tales featuring the Golem of Prague, an "artificial man" who in Eastern European Jewish folk lore saves his people from Anti-Semitic persecution. More contemporary materials might encompass the steampunk stories of Ted Chiang, 2017 Nobel Prize winner Kasuo Ishiguro’s heartbreaking "clone memoir" Never Let Me Go, Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi’s dark, absurdist tale of war and memory Frankenstein in Baghdad, and graphic novelist Victor Lavalle’s Destroyer, a story focused on the monstrous legacy of racism in America from slavery times to the age of Black Lives Matter. We’ll also watch and respond to the films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), as well as episodes from classic television shows like The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The course will consider the many contexts that have influenced Frankenstein stories over the years, including the politics of feminism, anarchism, imperialism, and anti-racism; a survey of cultural movements like romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism; and formal genres like the Gothic tale, the Victorian adventure yarn, and German Expressionist film.

O (CRN 10941) EH 208-11 with Holly Jones
"The Empire Writes (Back)": Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.

 

EH 209: HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course offers an in-depth examination of important works and their cultural contexts in a seminar format. Prerequisite: EH 101/101S and EH 102 OR EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 16 per section.

H (CRN 11009) EH 209-H1 with Jeffrey Nelson
Love in the Western World:  Euripides’ Medea, Virgil’s The Aeneid, Marie de France’s Lais, Chaucer’s “The Miller’s Tale” and “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale,” Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, and lyrics by Veronica Franco and other women of the Italian Renaissance.

H (CRN 11010) EH 209-H2 with Colleen Noletto
“Journeys and Encounters.” In this course, we will critically analyze journeys and encounters as represented in literature from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their cultural contexts. Texts will include The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, the poetry of Sappho, The Aeneid, The Inferno, A Thousand and One Nights, The Canterbury Tales, Don Quixote, and Hamlet, among others. 

H (CRN 11011) EH 209-H3 with Susan Friedman
H (CRN 11012) EH 209-H4 with Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.

H (CRN 11013) EH 209-H5 with Colleen Noletto
“Journeys and Encounters.” In this course, we will critically analyze journeys and encounters as represented in literature from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their cultural contexts. Texts will include The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, the poetry of Sappho, The Aeneid, The Inferno, A Thousand and One Nights, The Canterbury Tales, Don Quixote, and Hamlet, among others. 

 

EH 210: HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL 2 (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course offers an in-depth examination of important works and their cultural contexts in a seminar format. Prerequisite: EH 101/101S and EH 102 OR EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 16 per section.

H (CRN 11014) EH 210-H1 with  STAFF

H (CRN 11016) EH 210-H2 with Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies.” Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

H (CRN 13076) EH 210-H3 with Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies.” Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

H (CRN 11018) EH 210-H4 with Eric Smith
“The End of the World as We Know It”: This course will consider the emergence and development of the dystopia as a prominent expression of the contemporary social imaginary from a variety of national and cultural perspectives. We will discuss writers and filmmakers including Orwell, Bacigalupi, Atwood, London, Zamyatin, Padmnabhan, Lawrence, Beukes, Kahiu, and Cuarón.

H (CRN 11020) EH 210-H5 with Joseph Conway
Few literary works have had as much impact on modern culture than Mary Shelley’s 1818 masterpiece, Frankenstein. In this class we will immerse ourselves in the monstrous legacy of Shelley’s classic and the many cultural products it has inspired. Readings may include stories of mad scientists by old masters of the weird like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, and H.P. Lovecraft, as well as classic Yiddish tales featuring the Golem of Prague, an "artificial man" who in Eastern European Jewish folk lore saves his people from Anti-Semitic persecution. More contemporary materials might encompass the steampunk stories of Ted Chiang, 2017 Nobel Prize winner Kasuo Ishiguro’s heartbreaking "clone memoir" Never Let Me Go, Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi’s dark, absurdist tale of war and memory Frankenstein in Baghdad, and graphic novelist Victor Lavalle’s Destroyer, a story focused on the monstrous legacy of racism in America from slavery times to the age of Black Lives Matter. We’ll also watch and respond to the films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), as well as episodes from classic television shows like The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The course will consider the many contexts that have influenced Frankenstein stories over the years, including the politics of feminism, anarchism, imperialism, and anti-racism; a survey of cultural movements like romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism; and formal genres like the Gothic tale, the Victorian adventure yarn, and German Expressionist film.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to take EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 before I can take EH 208/210?

No. They can be taken in either order, though you must be enrolled in the Honors College to enroll in either EH 209 or 210. Consult your Program of Study to see if one or both courses are needed.

What if I already completed part of my Area II requirements before these new courses were introduced?

EH 207 (or EH 242) and 208 will substitute for what was previously EH 205, 206, 230, 231, 240, and 241. If you have already taken EH 205, 230, or 240 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 208. If you have already taken EH 206, 231, or 241 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 207 (or EH 242). Similarly, EH 209 and EH 210 will substitute for what was previously EH 250 and 251.

For more information, contact the English Department at eh@uah.edu or 256.824.6320.