General Education Requirements in English

Students can take several courses offered by the English Department to fulfill their Area II (Humanities and Fine Arts) General Education Requirements (Charger Foundations):

EH 207
Readings in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 208
Readings in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.
EH 242
Mythology - Archetypal, metaphorical, and historical significance of deities and myths. (Counts as EH 207 in the lit sequence.)
or
EH 209
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 210
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.

Although any EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 or 208/210 section will fulfill Area II requirements, the sections offered each semester will have specific themes and contents from which students can choose.

Spring 2019: EH 200-Level Courses

EH 207: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102, EH 103, or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 35 per section.

CRN 10992, EH 207 01, MW 09:40AM 11:00AM, Instructor: Dr. Angela Balla
"Unruly Passions": This course investigates how humans attempt to control their appetites, whether emotional, physical, intellectual, or spiritual. Readings include selections from Aeschylus' The Oresteia, Plato's Phaedrus, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Genesis, Paul's epistles, Abelard's and Heloise's letters, Dante's Inferno, Elizabeth I's speeches, Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Milton's Paradise Lost.

CRN 10922, EH 207 02, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. We will particularly be focusing on representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

CRN 10923, EH 207 03, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Seth Lee
When was the last time something you read made you stop and think? Perhaps it was an article in The New York Times or a recent, bestselling autobiography of a major world leader. The value of such writing is easy to assess. It’s current and topical, helping us navigate and understand recent events. What about something much older, something written in 1285 BCE? What value could the Babylonian Enuma Elish have to us in the 21st century, except as a historical artifact, a remnant from a time and culture long past? This course introduces you to literature of the ancient world through the Age of Discovery, roughly 1300 BCE-1700 CE, in hopes of answering such a question. We will experience the historical and literary distinctiveness of a variety of cultures – Babylonian, Greek, Roman, and English – and explore in them things that they share, human experiences that cross ethnic and geographical lines. You’ll also learn the basic vocabulary of literary studies, to read actively, and write critically. Literary studies encourage you to think differently than you’re likely used to, and engage a different part of your brain. Literature often asks us to ponder unanswerable questions and wrestle with problems as old as our species.

CRN 10924, EH 207 04, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. We will particularly be focusing on representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

CRN 10925, EH 207 05, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Seth Lee
When was the last time something you read made you stop and think? Perhaps it was an article in The New York Times or a recent, bestselling autobiography of a major world leader. The value of such writing is easy to assess. It’s current and topical, helping us navigate and understand recent events. What about something much older, something written in 1285 BCE? What value could the Babylonian Enuma Elish have to us in the 21st century, except as a historical artifact, a remnant from a time and culture long past? This course introduces you to literature of the ancient world through the Age of Discovery, roughly 1300 BCE-1700 CE, in hopes of answering such a question. We will experience the historical and literary distinctiveness of a variety of cultures – Babylonian, Greek, Roman, and English – and explore in them things that they share, human experiences that cross ethnic and geographical lines. You’ll also learn the basic vocabulary of literary studies, to read actively, and write critically. Literary studies encourage you to think differently than you’re likely used to, and engage a different part of your brain. Literature often asks us to ponder unanswerable questions and wrestle with problems as old as our species.

CRN 10926, EH 207 06, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. We will particularly be focusing on representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

CRN 10927, EH 207 07, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Joey Taylor
“Monsters and Premodern Culture”: This course explores how and why our ideas of the monster (including werewolves, witches, and monstrous races) shape and govern what we take to be normal or abnormal within our cultures, religions, and even our politics. Readings include The Epic of Gilgamesh, Oedipus Tyrannus, Beowulf, the Lais of Marie de France.

CRN 10928, EH 207 08, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Joey Taylor
“Monsters and Premodern Culture”: This course explores how and why our ideas of the monster (including werewolves, witches, and monstrous races) shape and govern what we take to be normal or abnormal within our cultures, religions, and even our politics. Readings include The Epic of Gilgamesh, Oedipus Tyrannus, Beowulf, the Lais of Marie de France.

CRN 10929, EH 207 09, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli
This course will cover literature from ancient Greece through the Early Modern period. We will particularly be focusing on representations of love in all its forms (i.e. eros, philia, storgae, agape, ludus, mania, pragma, philautia). Readings will include The Odyssey, Lysistrata, The Ramayana, The Thousand and One Nights, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, and poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Gwerful Mechain, and early Egyptian poets.

 

EH 208: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE II (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102, EH 103, or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 35 per section.

CRN 10936, EH 208 01, MWF 09:40AM 10:35AM, Instructor: Dr. Rebecca Hazelwood

CRN 10937, EH 208 02, MW 02:40PM 04:00PM, Instructor: Dr. Colleen Weir
“The (Un)Real in Literature”: In this course, we'll explore how a variety of authors and texts from the Age of Discovery onward represent "reality" and "unreality." Topics we'll investigate include the relationship between fiction and history, realism and magical realism, reading and misreading, satire, rumor, mental illness, the imagination, and the fantastic, to name a few. As we consider these texts and the social, historical, and philosophical contexts in which they emerged, we'll interrogate the concepts of "the real" and "the unreal" and examine closely the spaces in between. Authors may include, but are not limited to Cavendish, Bashō, Swift, Austen, Chekov, Morrison, Wells, Stoppard, Rushdie, and Le Guin.

CRN 10938, EH 208 03, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Holly Jones
"The Empire Writes (Back)": Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.

CRN 10939, EH 208 04, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Julie Naviaux
“Rage Against the Rules” examines how society often forces individuals into scripted expectations. But what happens when those individuals don’t follow the rules? Students will question how communities are formed through commonalities, how an individual is accepted (or rejected) within a community, and how the individual “rages” against the community, covering time periods from the Industrial Revolution’s beginnings to the 21st century. “Raging" includes issues of religious morality and dissent, conflicting political powers, imperialism and colonization, gender and sexual inequalities, mental illness redefinitions, and interracial conflicts. Grading will include 3 exams, 2 short papers, and a collection of low stakes assignments.

CRN 10942, EH 208 05, TR 09:40AM 11:00AM, Instructor: Dr. Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies”: Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

CRN 10940, EH 208 06, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Joe Conway
Few literary works have had as much impact on modern culture than Mary Shelley’s 1818 masterpiece, Frankenstein. In this class we will immerse ourselves in the monstrous legacy of Shelley’s classic and the many cultural products it has inspired. Readings may include stories of mad scientists by old masters of the weird like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, and H.P. Lovecraft, as well as classic Yiddish tales featuring the Golem of Prague, an "artificial man" who in Eastern European Jewish folk lore saves his people from Anti-Semitic persecution. More contemporary materials might encompass the steampunk stories of Ted Chiang, 2017 Nobel Prize winner Kasuo Ishiguro’s heartbreaking "clone memoir" Never Let Me Go, Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi’s dark, absurdist tale of war and memory Frankenstein in Baghdad, and graphic novelist Victor Lavalle’s Destroyer, a story focused on the monstrous legacy of racism in America from slavery times to the age of Black Lives Matter. We’ll also watch and respond to the films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), as well as episodes from classic television shows like The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The course will consider the many contexts that have influenced Frankenstein stories over the years, including the politics of feminism, anarchism, imperialism, and anti-racism; a survey of cultural movements like romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism; and formal genres like the Gothic tale, the Victorian adventure yarn, and German Expressionist film.

CRN 10943, EH 208 07, TR 09:40AM 11:00AM, Instructor: Dr. Suzy Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.

CRN 10952, EH 208 08, TR 11:20AM 12:40PM, Instructor: Heather Cross
“Disturbing Modernity” will look at the ability of literature to put you into a place or mind that is disturbed or disturbing. Themes of discrimination, mental instability, social issues and identity will be experienced via short stories, novels and poems as well as performance and film. Character, atmosphere, tone, theme and writer’s purpose will be analyzed to uncover what makes us as readers and humans uncomfortable. Main selections include pieces about race, Joyce Carol Oates’ Zombie, and the films A Clockwork Orange and American Psycho. Other stories and poems (A Modest Proposal, “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Dickenson, etc.) from the 1700s, 1800s, 1900s, and 2000s will be investigated for precursors, connections and cultural ideas of the disturbing as presented in literature. Essays and response papers are the main assignments. Mature themes, language and topics will be discussed.

CRN 10953, EH 208 09, TR 01:00PM 02:20PM, Instructor: Dr. Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies”: Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

CRN 10954, EH 208 10, TR 02:40PM 04:00PM, Instructor: Dr. Suzy Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.

CRN 10955, EH 208 11, TR 02:40PM 04:00PM, Instructor: Dr. Colleen Weir
“The (Un)Real in Literature”: In this course, we'll explore how a variety of authors and texts from the Age of Discovery onward represent "reality" and "unreality." Topics we'll investigate include the relationship between fiction and history, realism and magical realism, reading and misreading, satire, rumor, mental illness, the imagination, and the fantastic, to name a few. As we consider these texts and the social, historical, and philosophical contexts in which they emerged, we'll interrogate the concepts of "the real" and "the unreal" and examine closely the spaces in between. Authors may include, but are not limited to Cavendish, Bashō, Swift, Austen, Chekov, Morrison, Wells, Stoppard, Rushdie, and Le Guin.

CRN 10941, EH 208 12, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Joe Conway
Few literary works have had as much impact on modern culture than Mary Shelley’s 1818 masterpiece, Frankenstein. In this class we will immerse ourselves in the monstrous legacy of Shelley’s classic and the many cultural products it has inspired. Readings may include stories of mad scientists by old masters of the weird like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, and H.P. Lovecraft, as well as classic Yiddish tales featuring the Golem of Prague, an "artificial man" who in Eastern European Jewish folk lore saves his people from Anti-Semitic persecution. More contemporary materials might encompass the steampunk stories of Ted Chiang, 2017 Nobel Prize winner Kasuo Ishiguro’s heartbreaking "clone memoir" Never Let Me Go, Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi’s dark, absurdist tale of war and memory Frankenstein in Baghdad, and graphic novelist Victor Lavalle’s Destroyer, a story focused on the monstrous legacy of racism in America from slavery times to the age of Black Lives Matter. We’ll also watch and respond to the films Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), as well as episodes from classic television shows like The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The course will consider the many contexts that have influenced Frankenstein stories over the years, including the politics of feminism, anarchism, imperialism, and anti-racism; a survey of cultural movements like romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism; and formal genres like the Gothic tale, the Victorian adventure yarn, and German Expressionist film.

 

EH 209: HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course offers an in-depth examination of important works and their cultural contexts in a seminar format. Prerequisite: EH 101/101S and EH 102 OR EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 16 per section.

CRN 11009, EH 209 H1, MW 11:20AM 12:40PM, Instructor: Dr. Jeff Nelson
“Love in the Western World”: Is "true love" the same throughout history and across cultures? How is love represented and, more importantly, how are views of love constructed? Euripides' Medea, Virgil's Aeneid, Chaucer's The Miller's Tale and The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale, Marie de Frances Lais, poetry by Italian women of the Italian Renaissance, and Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.

CRN 11010, EH 209 H2, MW 11:20AM 12:40PM, Instructor: Dr. Angela Balla
"Unruly Passions": This course investigates how humans attempt to control their appetites, whether emotional, physical, intellectual, or spiritual. Readings include selections from Aeschylus' The Oresteia, Plato's Phaedrus, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Genesis, Paul's epistles, Abelard's and Heloise's letters, Dante's Inferno, Elizabeth I's speeches, Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Milton's Paradise Lost.

CRN 11011, EH 209 H3, MW 02:40PM 04:00PM, Instructor: Dr. Angela Balla
"Unruly Passions": This course investigates how humans attempt to control their appetites, whether emotional, physical, intellectual, or spiritual. Readings include selections from Aeschylus' The Oresteia, Plato's Phaedrus, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Genesis, Paul's epistles, Abelard's and Heloise's letters, Dante's Inferno, Elizabeth I's speeches, Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Milton's Paradise Lost.

CRN 11012, EH 209 H4, TR 08:00AM 09:20AM, Instructor: Dr. Chad Thomas
CRN 11013, EH 209 H5, TR 09:40AM 11:00AM, Instructor: Dr. Chad Thomas

"LOVE HURTS!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, etc.) At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting cultural representations of normative gender and desire.

 

EH 210: HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL 2 (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course offers an in-depth examination of important works and their cultural contexts in a seminar format. Prerequisite: EH 101/101S and EH 102 OR EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 16 per section.

CRN 11014, EH 210 H1, MWF 11:20AM 12:15PM, Instructor: Dr. Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 21st century with contemporary literature. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works.

CRN 11016, EH 210 H2, MW 09:40AM 11:00AM, Instructor: Dr. Holly Jones
"The Empire Writes (Back)": Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.

CRN 11017, EH 210 H3, MW 11:20AM 12:40PM, Instructor: Dr. Holly Jones
"The Empire Writes (Back)": Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.

CRN 11018, EH 210 H4, TR 11:20AM 12:40PM, Instructor: Dr. Eric Smith
“The End of the World as We Know It”: This course will consider the emergence and development of the dystopia as a prominent expression of the contemporary social imaginary from a variety of national and cultural perspectives. We will discuss writers and filmmakers including Orwell, Bacigalupi, Atwood, London, Zamyatin, Padmnabhan, Lawrence, Beukes, Kahiu, and Cuarón.

CRN 11020, EH 210 H5, TR 01:00PM 02:20PM, Instructor: Heather Cross
“Disturbing Modernity” will look at the ability of literature to put you into a place or mind that is disturbed or disturbing. Themes of discrimination, mental instability, social issues and identity will be experienced via short stories, novels and poems as well as performance and film. Character, atmosphere, tone, theme and writer’s purpose will be analyzed to uncover what makes us as readers and humans uncomfortable. Main selections include pieces Ta-nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, Joyce Carol Oates’ Zombie, and the films A Clockwork Orange and American Psycho. Other stories and poems (A Modest Proposal, “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Dickenson, etc.) from the 1700s, 1800s, 1900s, and 2000s will be investigated for precursors, connections and cultural ideas of the disturbing as presented in literature. Essays and response papers are the main assignments. Mature themes, language and topics will be discussed.

 

(W) CRN 11023, EH 242 01: MYTHOLOGY, MW 11:20AM 12:40PM, Instructor: Dr. Laurel Bollinger
Some of the most important stories humans have ever told themselves are now described as myths—stories that wrestle with the nature of being human, with life and death, and with our relation to the world. In other words, myth traditions explore the very concept of the sacred as it has been explored through human history. This course will visit sacred narratives from around the world, including Greece and Rome, Mesopotamia, Nordic countries, MesoAmerica, Africa, and North America. Myth continues to have a grip on the human imagination. Let’s think about why!
(Course counts toward WGS Minor and toward Charger Foundations)

(W) CRN 11024, EH 242 02: MYTHOLOGY, ONLINE, Instructor: Dr. Laurel Bollinger
Some of the most important stories humans have ever told themselves are now described as myths—stories that wrestle with the nature of being human, with life and death, and with our relation to the world. In other words, myth traditions explore the very concept of the sacred as it has been explored through human history. This course will visit sacred narratives from around the world, including Greece and Rome, Mesopotamia, Nordic countries, MesoAmerica, Africa, and North America. Myth continues to have a grip on the human imagination. Let’s think about why!
(Course counts toward WGS Minor and toward Charger Foundations)

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to take EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 before I can take EH 208/210?

No. They can be taken in either order, though you must be enrolled in the Honors College to enroll in either EH 209 or 210. Consult your Program of Study to see if one or both courses are needed.

What if I already completed part of my Area II requirements before these new courses were introduced?

EH 207 (or EH 242) and 208 will substitute for what was previously EH 205, 206, 230, 231, 240, and 241. If you have already taken EH 205, 230, or 240 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 208. If you have already taken EH 206, 231, or 241 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 207 (or EH 242). Similarly, EH 209 and EH 210 will substitute for what was previously EH 250 and 251.

For more information, contact the English Department at eh@uah.edu or 256.824.6320.