General Education Requirements in English

Students can take several courses offered by the English Department to fulfill their Area II (Humanities and Fine Arts) General Education Requirements (Charger Foundations):

EH 207
Readings in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 208
Readings in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.
EH 242
Mythology - Archetypal, metaphorical, and historical significance of deities and myths. (Counts as EH 207 in the lit sequence.)
or
EH 209
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 210
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.

Although any EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 or 208/210 section will fulfill Area II requirements, the sections offered each semester will have specific themes and contents from which students can choose.

Fall 2019: EH 200-Level Courses

EH 207: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102, EH 103, or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 35 per section.

CRN 91388 207 01 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, TR 04:20PM 05:40PM, Dr. Laurel Bollinger
“The Hero.” This course examines heroes, both male and female, in their specific cultural contexts. Readings include The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, Medea, The Recognition of Śakuntala, The Koran, The Thousand and One Nights, poems from The Kokinshu, Tale of Genji, Sonjata, Popul Vuh, and Hamlet.

CRN 91389 207 02 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, TR 02:40PM 04:00PM, Dr. Susan Friedman

CRN 91390 207 03 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Lacy Marschalk-Brecciaroli

CRN 91391 207 04 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, TR 09:40AM 11:00AM, Dr. Susan Friedman

CRN 91392 207 05 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, MWF 02:40PM 03:45PM, Dr. Angela Balla

CRN 91393 207 06 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, MWF 11:20AM 12:15PM, Dr. Angela Balla

CRN 91394 207 07 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire

CRN 91395 207 08 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Laurel Bollinger
“The Hero.” This course examines heroes, both male and female, in their specific cultural contexts. Readings include The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, Medea, The Recognition of Śakuntala, The Koran, The Thousand and One Nights, poems from The Kokinshu, Tale of Genji, Sonjata, Popul Vuh, and Hamlet.

CRN 91396 207 09 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Chad Thomas
"Love Hurts!" In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with love (romantic, erotic, familial, spiritual, cultural, social, physical, psychic, geographic, etc.) and the pain often associated with it. At the same time, we will consider the implications of love and desire in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms, with popular depictions of performative identity, and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions, with shifting representations of normative gender and desire

CRN 92607 207 10 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE I, ONLINE, Dr. Joseph Taylor
Monsters! This course will explore literary monsters of all sorts. Through the monster, we will explore modes of normative identity set against the abnormal and the monstrous. We will examine how these texts, and the cultures that produced them, establish and/or call into question various political, religious, and cultural systems from ancient times to the seventeenth century. We will question how and why our ideas of the monster shape and govern our own normative models and how movement across diverse cultural spaces destabilizes these models in profound moments of cultural contact. Our main texts for this course will include the ancient Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, the fifth-century BCE drama Oedipus Tyrannus, the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, the fourteenth-century Middle English poems Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Canterbury Tales, the sixteenth-century Spanish picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes, and Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, among other texts.

 

EH 208: READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE II (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course introduces students to the methods of literary study through an examination of works in their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prerequisite: EH 102, EH 103, or EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 35 per section.

CRN 91397 208 01 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, TR 02:40PM 04:00PM, Dr. Ann Foy

“Enlightenment and Its Legacies.” Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

CRN 91398 208 02 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, TR 01:00PM 02:20PM, Dr. Eric Smith

CRN 91399 208 03 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, TR 09:40AM 11:00AM, Dr. Anna Foy

“Enlightenment and Its Legacies.” Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.

CRN 91400 208 04 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, MW 11:20AM 12:40PM, Dr. Colleen Noletto
“Between You and Me”: This course will explore interpersonal relationships—between friends, partners, families, and professionals—as presented by a variety of authors in multiple genres from the seventeenth century to the present. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their respective historical, social and philosophical contexts. Authors may include Austen, Chekov, Morrison, Ishiguro, Lahiri, Eliot, O’Connor, and Marquez, among others.

CRN 91401 208 05 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, MW 08:00AM 09:20AM, STAFF

CRN 91402 208 06 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, ONLINE, Dr. James Coby
"Moral Panic! Banned and Challenged Literature!"

CRN 91403 208 07 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, ONLINE, Dr. Holly Jones

CRN 91404 208 08 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, ONLINE, Dr. Colleen Noletto
“Between You and Me”: This course will explore interpersonal relationships—between friends, partners, families, and professionals—as presented by a variety of authors in multiple genres from the seventeenth century to the present. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their respective historical, social and philosophical contexts. Authors may include Austen, Chekov, Morrison, Ishiguro, Lahiri, Eliot, O’Connor, and Marquez, among others.

CRN 91405 208 09 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, ONLINE, Dr. Holly Jones

CRN 91406 208 10 READINGS LITERATURE/CULTURE 2, ONLINE, Dr. James Coby
"Moral Panic! Banned and Challenged Literature!"

 

EH 209: HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL I (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery. The course offers an in-depth examination of important works and their cultural contexts in a seminar format. Prerequisite: EH 101/101S and EH 102 OR EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 16 per section.

H CRN 91407 209 H1 HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL I, MW 02:40PM 04:00PM, Dr. Susan Friedman

 

EH 210: HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL 2 (Semester Hours: 3). Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present. The course offers an in-depth examination of important works and their cultural contexts in a seminar format. Prerequisite: EH 101/101S and EH 102 OR EH 105. Maximum enrollment: 16 per section.

H CRN 91409 210 H1 HONORS SEM READINGS LIT/CUL 2, TR 11:20AM 12:40PM, Dr. Eric Smith

 

CRN 91410 211 01 INTRO CREATIVE WRITING, MW 02:40PM 04:00PM, STAFF

CRN 91411 211 02 INTRO CREATIVE WRITING, TR 11:20AM 12:40PM, Anna Weber

CRN 91412 260 01 INTRO TO WRITING MAJOR, M 02:40PM 03:35PM, Dr. Alanna Frost

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to take EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 before I can take EH 208/210?

No. They can be taken in either order, though you must be enrolled in the Honors College to enroll in either EH 209 or 210. Consult your Program of Study to see if one or both courses are needed.

What if I already completed part of my Area II requirements before these new courses were introduced?

EH 207 (or EH 242) and 208 will substitute for what was previously EH 205, 206, 230, 231, 240, and 241. If you have already taken EH 205, 230, or 240 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 208. If you have already taken EH 206, 231, or 241 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 207 (or EH 242). Similarly, EH 209 and EH 210 will substitute for what was previously EH 250 and 251.

For more information, contact the English Department at eh@uah.edu or 256.824.6320.