General Education Requirements in English

Students can take several courses offered by the English Department to fulfill their Area II (Humanities and Fine Arts) General Education Requirements (Charger Foundations):

EH 207
Readings in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 208
Readings in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.
EH 242
Mythology - Archetypal, metaphorical, and historical significance of deities and myths. (Counts as EH 207 in the lit sequence.)
or
EH 209
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture I - Critical analysis of texts from ancient times through the Age of Discovery.
EH 210
Honors Seminar in Literature and Culture II - Critical analysis of texts from the Age of Discovery through the present.

Although any EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 or 208/210 section will fulfill Area II requirements, the sections offered each semester will have specific themes and contents from which students can choose.

Spring 2018: 200-Level Courses

COURSE    CRN MAX ENRL TITLE TIME HRS ROOM INSTRUCTOR
EH 207-01 10451 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I MWF 10:30AM-11:25AM 3.0 MOR 300 Angela Balla
"Unruly Passions": This course investigates how humans attempt to control their appetites, whether emotional, physical, intellectual, or spiritual. Readings include selections from Aeschylus' The Oresteia, Plato's Phaedrus, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Genesis, Paul's epistles, Abelard's and Heloise's letters, Dante's Inferno, Elizabeth I's speeches, Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Milton's Paradise Lost.
EH 207-02 10452 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I MWF 11:45AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 300 Angela Balla
"Unruly Passions": This course investigates how humans attempt to control their appetites, whether emotional, physical, intellectual, or spiritual. Readings include selections from Aeschylus' The Oresteia, Plato's Phaedrus, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Genesis, Paul's epistles, Abelard's and Heloise's letters, Dante's Inferno, Elizabeth I's speeches, Shakespeare's Macbeth, and Milton's Paradise Lost.
EH 207-03 10453 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I MW 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 204 J. Seth Lee
Literary studies encourage us to think differently, and asks us to ponder difficult questions as old as our species. This course introduces you to literature of the ancient world through the Age of Discovery, roughly 1300BCE-1700CE. We will experience the historical and literary distinctiveness of a variety of cultures – Egyptian, Greek, European, Middle Eastern, English, Indian, Chinese, and Japanese – and explore in them things that they share, human experiences that cross ethnic and geographical lines. You’ll learn the basic vocabulary of literary studies, to read actively, and write critically.
EH 207-04 10454 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 204 Chad Thomas
In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with transformation. At the same time, we will consider the implications of these texts in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions.
EH 207-05 10455 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 122 J. Seth Lee
Literary studies encourage us to think differently, and asks us to ponder difficult questions as old as our species. This course introduces you to literature of the ancient world through the Age of Discovery, roughly 1300BCE-1700CE. We will experience the historical and literary distinctiveness of a variety of cultures – Egyptian, Greek, European, Middle Eastern, English, Indian, Chinese, and Japanese – and explore in them things that they share, human experiences that cross ethnic and geographical lines. You’ll learn the basic vocabulary of literary studies, to read actively, and write critically.
EH 207-06 10456 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I TR 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 MOR 204 William Taylor
“Monsters and Pre-modern Culture”: This course explores how and why our ideas of the monster (including werewolves, witches, and monstrous races) shape and govern what we take to be normal or abnormal within our cultures, religions, and even our politics. Readings include The Epic of GilgameshOedipus TyrannusBeowulf, the Lais of Marie de France.
EH 207-07 10457 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 204 William Taylor
“Monsters and Pre-modern Culture”: This course explores how and why our ideas of the monster (including werewolves, witches, and monstrous races) shape and govern what we take to be normal or abnormal within our cultures, religions, and even our politics. Readings include The Epic of GilgameshOedipus TyrannusBeowulf, the Lais of Marie de France.
EH 207-08 10458 35 Readings in Literature & Culture I TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 300 Chad Thomas
In this course, we will read and respond to a variety of texts that deal with transformation. At the same time, we will consider the implications of these texts in and for political, social, and cultural contexts more generally. We will pay special attention to the development of dramatic forms and to the ongoing rewriting of epic and poetic traditions.
EH 208-01 10459 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II MWF 9:15AM-10:10AM 3.0 MOR 204 Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.
EH 208-02 10460 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 300 Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.
EH 208-03 10461 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 124 Colleen Weir
This course will explore interpersonal relationships—between friends, partners, families, and professionals—as presented by a variety of authors in multiple genres from the 1700s to the present. Additionally, we will consider these texts’ relationship to their respective historical, social and philosophical contexts. Authors may include Austen, Wilde, Morrison, Ishiguro, Eliot, Lewis, and Tolkien, among others.
EH 208-04 10462 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE Joseph Conway
There are few faces more iconic than the one you see in this picture. When most of us think of Frankenstein, we tend to think of this groaning, green-faced monster with bolts on his neck. We can imagine him walking slowly and awkwardly like a zombie, arms held out in front of him as he chases his next victim.
EH 208-05 10463 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 MOR 124 Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies”: Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.
EH 208-06 10464 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 MOR 310 Julie Naviaux
This course studies works of literature covering such topics as historical wars, political wars, social wars, cultural wars, and class wars from 18th through 21st centuries. Possible texts include: Robinson Crusoe, David Foster Wallace poetry, The Romance of a ShopMaus, Red Badge of Courage, Persuasion, “The Things They Carried,” and All Quiet on the Western Front.
EH 208-07 10465 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 LIB 111 Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 20th century with Postwar, Postmodern, and Postcolonial Literature. In addition, students will view one film by acclaimed filmmaker Charles Chaplin that brilliantly satirizes the political and social concerns of the World War II era. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works. Class discussion will examine various ways that these writers’ texts represent their personal philosophies, their historical time period, and their countries of origin. We will also explore how these texts are relevant for today’s 21st century readers.
EH 208-08 10466 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 310 Julie Naviaux
This course studies works of literature covering such topics as historical wars, political wars, social wars, cultural wars, and class wars from 18th through 21st centuries. Possible texts include: Robinson Crusoe, David Foster Wallace poetry, The Romance of a ShopMaus, Red Badge of Courage, Persuasion, “The Things They Carried,” and All Quiet on the Western Front.
EH 208-09 10467 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 MOR 300 Anna Foy
“Enlightenment and Its Legacies”: Who first proposed that we conduct scientific experiments with a “method”? What cultural and intellectual changes laid the groundwork for the American Revolution? This class will examine classic, consequential texts from the European Enlightenment and consider its lasting, global impact. Authors may include Bacon, Voltaire, Equiano, Ibsen, Conrad, and Woolf.
EH 208-10 10468 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 204 Holly Jones
Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.
EH 208-11 10469 35 Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 300 Julie Naviaux
This course studies works of literature covering such topics as historical wars, political wars, social wars, cultural wars, and class wars from 18th through 21st centuries. Possible texts include: Robinson Crusoe, David Foster Wallace poetry, The Romance of a ShopMaus, Red Badge of Courage, Persuasion, “The Things They Carried,” and All Quiet on the Western Front.
EH 209-01 10470 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture I MW 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 MOR 208 Laurel Bollinger
“The Hero”: This course examines heroes, both male and female, in their specific cultural contexts. Readings include The Epic of GilgameshThe OdysseyMedeaThe Recognition of ŚakuntalaThe KoranThe Thousand and One Nights, poems from The KokinshuTale of Genji, SonjataPopul Vuh, and Hamlet.
EH 209-02 10471 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture I MW 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 203 Laurel Bollinger
“The Hero”: This course examines heroes, both male and female, in their specific cultural contexts. Readings include The Epic of GilgameshThe OdysseyMedeaThe Recognition of ŚakuntalaThe KoranThe Thousand and One Nights, poems from The KokinshuTale of Genji, SonjataPopul Vuh, and Hamlet.
EH 209-03 10472 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture I MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 208 Angela Balla
“Living the Good Life Before Modernity”: What does it mean to live the good life? What counts as the highest good (the summum bonum), and how does one pursue it? Are the consequences of that pursuit always worth it, particularly when the goal—virtue, happiness, success, power, prestige, peace, well-being, something else—isn’t necessarily attainable? And what happens, individually and communally, when one’s notion of the good life changes? To begin to answer these questions, we will read texts from ancient Greece, Rome, and the Middle East, as well as from medieval and early modern Europe.
EH 209-04 10473 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture I TR 8:00AM-9:20AM 3.0 MOR 203 Jeffrey Nelson
“Love in the Western World”: Euripedes' Medea, Virgil's Aeneid, Marie de France's Lais, Chaucer's Miller's Tale and The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale, Renaissance love lyrics, Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.
EH 209-05 10474 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture I TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 208 Jeffrey Nelson
“Love in the Western World”: Euripedes' Medea, Virgil's Aeneid, Marie de France's Lais, Chaucer's Miller's Tale and The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale, Renaissance love lyrics, Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.
EH 210-01 10475 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture II MWF 11:45AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 208 Susan Friedman
In this survey course, students will read poetry, nonfiction and fiction by writers from around the world, beginning in the 17th century with the Enlightenment, and ending in the 21st century with contemporary literature. To better understand literature from this expansive period, students will read a variety of texts, including classics and less widely known, but nevertheless significant works.
EH 210-02 10476 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture II MW 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 MOR 203 Joseph Conway
"Myth in the Modern World":  This course focuses on how three western myths - Faust, Frankenstein, and Bluebeard - are consistently used by writers and filmmakers to dramatize the contradictions in identity and social belonging associated with the process of becoming modern. Readings will include fairy tales, as well as works by Mary Shelley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, Phillip K. Dick, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, Mikhail Bulgakov, and Helen Oyeyemi.
EH 210-03 10477 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture II MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 203 Joseph Conway
"Myth in the Modern World":  This course focuses on how three western myths - Faust, Frankenstein, and Bluebeard - are consistently used by writers and filmmakers to dramatize the contradictions in identity and social belonging associated with the process of becoming modern. Readings will include fairy tales, as well as works by Mary Shelley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H.G. Wells, Phillip K. Dick, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, Mikhail Bulgakov, and Helen Oyeyemi.
EH 210-04 10478 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 203 Eric Smith
“The End of the World as We Know It”: This course will consider the emergence and development of the dystopia as a prominent expression of the contemporary social imaginary from a variety of national and cultural perspectives. We will discuss writers and filmmakers including Orwell, Bacigalupi, Atwood, London, Zamyatin, Padmnabhan, Lawrence, Beukes, Kahiu, and Cuarón.
EH 210-05 10479 15 Honors Seminar: Readings in Literature & Culture II TR 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 MOR 203 Holly Jones
Students will engage six such major texts, three that are artifacts of past colonialisms (A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Heart of Darkness, and A Passage to India) and three more that participate in postcolonial responses to these instances of colonialism (Flight, Nervous Conditions, and Fasting, Feasting). Our aim will be to examine these works in conversation with one another while at the same time learning more about each work’s contextual colonial (and at times neocolonial) histories.

Spring 2018: Business and Technical Writing Courses

COURSE    CRN MAX ENRL TITLE TIME HRS ROOM INSTRUCTOR
EH 300-01 10481 20 Strategies for Business Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE Sinceree Gunn
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 300-02 10482 20 Strategies for Business Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE Sinceree Gunn
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 300-03 10483 20 Strategies for Business Writing TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 LIB 211 Diane Singer
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 300-04 10484 20 Strategies for Business Writing TR 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 LIB 206 Diane Singer
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 300-05 10485 20 Strategies for Business Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE John Berry
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 300-06 10486 20 Strategies for Business Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE John Berry
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 300-07 10487 20 Strategies for Business Writing TR 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 LIB 206 LaDawn Edwards
Practical business writing with emphasis on rhetoric, organization, and research. Open to all students in the College of Business or by permission of the Department of English. Qualifies as elective in the English major. Does not count toward English minor. Junior standing required.
EH 301-01 10488 20 Technical Writing MWF 10:30AM-11:25AM 3.0 LIB 206 Sinceree Gunn
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-02 10489 20 Technical Writing MW 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 LIB 211 Diane Singer
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-03 10490 20 Technical Writing MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 LIB 211 Diane Singer
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-04 10491 20 Technical Writing TR 9:40AM-11:00AM 3.0 LIB 207 Elizabeth Hardin
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-05 10492 20 Technical Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE Sinceree Gunn
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-07 10494 20 Technical Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE Ryan Weber
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-08 10495 20 Technical Writing ONLINE 3.0 ONLINE John Berry
Practical writing, especially technical or scientific reports and proposals, with emphasis on organization, research, and presentation.
EH 301-H6 10493 20 Honors Technical Writing TR 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 LIB 211 Joy Robinson
This course explores the topic of technical writing beginning with the basic 8Cs and moving through more complex concepts. Students will create artifacts aimed at one audience and then adapt/modify/repurpose them to reach/address different audiences. This class helps to improve your communication competence; go beyond complete and accurate communication and develop an effective style in your interpersonal conversations, in your presentations, in your formal and informal writing, and in your project designs.
EH 302-01 10496 20 Technical Editing TR 4:20PM-5:40PM 3.0 LIB 207 Joy Robinson
This course stresses clarifying, improving, and rewriting technical reports and documents created by others. Emphasis is on the elements of style and usage, revision, proofreading, and application of rhetorical and editing techniques as applied to the work of engineers, scientists, and technicians. Students are assigned to work on long-term collaborative projects with student engineering teams.
EH 302-01 10496 20 Technical Editing R 6:00PM-7:20PM 1.0 LIB 207 Joy Robinson
This course stresses clarifying, improving, and rewriting technical reports and documents created by others. Emphasis is on the elements of style and usage, revision, proofreading, and application of rhetorical and editing techniques as applied to the work of engineers, scientists, and technicians. Students are assigned to work on long-term collaborative projects with student engineering teams.
EH 320-01 10497 5 Practicum in Writing TBA 3.0 TBA Ryan Weber
Writing and editing under the supervision of professionals. Enrollment requires advance planning.

Spring 2018: Upper Division Courses

COURSE    CRN MAX ENRL TITLE TIME HRS ROOM INSTRUCTOR
EH 211-01 10480 15 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 11:45AM-12:40PM 3.0 MOR 238 Erin Reid
Students will discuss contemporary stories/poems and will participate in workshops, where their own poetry and fiction is examined and critiqued by the class and instructor. The class culminates in two revision portfolios (one fiction and one poetry).
EH 335-01 10498 25 Survey British Literature TR 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 MOR 124 Lacy Marschalk
Writers, genres, and periods from Beowulf through the present.
EH 340-01 10499 20 Academic Writing TR 11:20AM-12:40PM 3.0 LIB 207 Gaines Hubbell
Advanced academic writing designed to prepare students for the writing, research, and publishing requirements of their field of study.
EH 410-01 10500 10 Fiction Writing M 5:50PM-8:40PM 3.0 MOR 208 Anna Weber
Practice in writing fiction from conception to revision. Students will read and write contemporary literary fiction. Student work will be commented on and critiqued in regular class workshops. The class culminates in a revision portfolio.
EH 410-02 10502 10 Fiction Writing TR 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 MOR 208 Anna Weber
Practice in writing fiction from conception to revision. Students will read and write contemporary literary fiction. Student work will be commented on and critiqued in regular class workshops. The class culminates in a revision portfolio.
EH 430-01 11851 15 The American Novel MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 326 Holly Jones
This course will focus on a selection of novels written by American authors who are members of ethnically and racially “minor” communities within the U.S., specifically Latin, Asian-American, Native-American, and white-ethnic American communities. Alongside our engagement with these novels, we will read and discuss Falguni Sheth's Toward a Political Philosophy of Race (2009). While doing so, we will explore such questions as, "What is race?," "What is ethnicity?," "What do race and ethnicity do?," and "How do race and ethnicity play a role in our interpretations of (and interactions with) American novels?"
EH 440-01 10506 15 Special Studies in English Literature TR 4:20PM-5:40PM 3.0 MOR 232J Anna Foy
“The Colonies and the Classics”: The U.S. Capitol Building, the Lincoln Memorial, and the White House were all built to resemble the architectural styles of ancient Greece and Rome. But why? This course examines the “neoclassical” era of British writing that led up to the American founding, when it was popular to consult the classics for wisdom, imitate their forms, and contemplate the rise and fall of Rome as a cautionary tale of imperial hubris. British writers’ admiration for the classics was more complicated than we might assume from D.C. architecture. Nowhere was this truer than in discussions of the American colonies, where the prominence of slavery and the relative primitiveness of society recalled the seamier side of Greco-Roman existence. We will read a handful of ancient works (Virgil, Homer) alongside transatlantic “neoclassical” greats (Behn, Pope, Wheatley, Grainger, Equiano, Southey), concluding with Miranda’s recent smash Broadway hit Hamilton, with its cathartic tale of U.S. immigrant identity.
EH 460-01 10508 15 Special Studies in English Literature TR 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 203 Jeffrey Nelson
Love Conventions of the English Renaissance. 1. Sonnets and the Petrarchan Tradition: Wyatt, Sidney, Shakespeare. 2. Romance and Allegory: Spenser's The Faerie Queene. 3. Other Genres/Other Voices: Mary Wroth, Mary Herbert, Isabella Whitney, Richard Barnfield.
EH 461-01 10509 25 Shakespeare I MW 4:20pm-5:40PM 3.0 MOR 326 Chad Thomas
"Love hurts!" In this class, we will examine several of Shakespeare’s works that deal explicitly with issues related to love. How is love “performed?” In what ways do conceptions of homosocial and heterosexual love differ? How does love contribute to the affectivity of Shakespeare’s plays? In what ways is love painful or destructive, and to what end? We shall examine the plays as relics of theatrical experiences with attention given to conditions of production in Shakespeare’s theater and to the possibilities for performance in our own time. We will also consider the connection between performance and multiple modes of meaning.
EH 463-01 10510 15 Capstone in Writing T 2:40PM-4:40PM 2.0 MOR 208 Alanna Frost
A senior capstone course for the Writing BA for which students will complete a portfolio of their writing. Portfolios will include reflection on and revision to selected samples of course-participants' writing and a scholarly project completed for the capstone course.

Spring 2018: Graduate or JUMP Courses

COURSE    CRN MAX ENRL TITLE TIME HRS ROOM INSTRUCTOR
EH 510-01 10501 5 Advanced Fiction Writing M 5:50PM-8:40PM 3.0 MOR 208 Anna Weber
Practice in writing fiction from conception to revision. Students will read and write contemporary literary fiction. Student work will be commented on and critiqued in regular class workshops. The class culminates in a revision portfolio.
EH 510-02 10503 5 Advanced Fiction Writing TR 1:00PM-2:20PM 3.0 MOR 208 Anna Weber
Practice in writing fiction from conception to revision. Students will read and write contemporary literary fiction. Student work will be commented on and critiqued in regular class workshops. The class culminates in a revision portfolio.
EH 530-01 11852 10 Special Studies in American Literature MW 2:40PM-4:00PM 3.0 MOR 326 Holly Jones
This course will focus on a selection of novels written by American authors who are members of ethnically and racially “minor” communities within the U.S., specifically Latin, Asian-American, Native-American, and white-ethnic American communities. Alongside our engagement with these novels, we will read and discuss Falguni Sheth's Toward a Political Philosophy of Race (2009).  While doing so, we will explore such questions as, "What is race?," "What is ethnicity?," "What do race and ethnicity do?," and "How do race and ethnicity play a role in our interpretations of (and interactions with) American novels?"
EH 540-01 10507 15 Special Studies in English Literature TR 4:20PM-5:40PM 3.0 MOR 232J Anna Foy
“The Colonies and the Classics”: The U.S. Capitol Building, the Lincoln Memorial, and the White House were all built to resemble the architectural styles of ancient Greece and Rome. But why? This course examines the “neoclassical” era of British writing that led up to the American founding, when it was popular to consult the classics for wisdom, imitate their forms, and contemplate the rise and fall of Rome as a cautionary tale of imperial hubris. British writers’ admiration for the classics was more complicated than we might assume from D.C. architecture. Nowhere was this truer than in discussions of the American colonies, where the prominence of slavery and the relative primitiveness of society recalled the seamier side of Greco-Roman existence. We will read a handful of ancient works (Virgil, Homer) alongside transatlantic “neoclassical” greats (Behn, Pope, Wheatley, Grainger, Equiano, Southey), concluding with Miranda’s recent smash Broadway hit Hamilton, with its cathartic tale of U.S. immigrant identity.
EH 601-01 10511 15 Action Research Writing Studies M 5:50PM-8:40PM 3.0 MOR 203 Alanna Frost
Analysis of research on writing in the workplace, the community, and educational settings.
EH 602-01 10512 5 Practicum/Technical Communication TBA 3.0 TBA Ryan Weber
Designed to give technical communication graduate students on-the-job experience in industry or government, either through an internship or a major research project connected with an industry problem. Requires completion of a substantial research report.
EH 603-01 10513 12 Editing for Publication TBA 3.0 TBA Joy Robinson
This ONLINE course teaches students to prepare documents for publication. The class emphasizes writing for specific audiences and teaches students to edit documents for usability, organization, consistency, clarity, and correctness. Students are encouraged to work on their writing projects as a part of the class. The textbook, activities, and assignments are designed to assist students in preparing their work or another writer's work for publication.
EH 631-01 10514 15 Study American Literature Since 1865 R 5:50PM-8:40PM 3.0 MOR 318 Laurel Bollinger
“American Memories, American Nostalgia”: Throughout American literature, our writers have recalled our shared history in ways both celebratory and cautionary. For this course, we will look at novels that reflect on the past, looking to understand the complexity of responses that defy simple binaries of condemnation or praise. How have our major authors participated in conversations about the nature of American identity, and what can those conversations help us understand about our nation and ourselves?
EH 649-01 10515 15 Special Studies Writing About Science & Technology TBA 3.0 TBA Ryan Weber
Study of significant issues in literature, technical communication, or composition studies, announced in advance.
EH 655-01 10516 15 Studies in Medieval Literature W 5:50PM-8:40PM 3.0 MOR 208 William Taylor
“Medieval Outlaws, Outcasts, and Others”: We will examine otherness in the context of law, nation, race and religion. The course explores natural and positive law and theories of sovereignty while looking further into political theological theories related to the outlaw, the neighbor, and monstrous others confronting the medieval west. We will read texts from the 10th to the 16th centuries, engaging moments such as the Norman Conquest of England, the Crusades (1-3), and the Black Plague. Texts include Beowulf, the Chanson de Roland, Richard Coer de Lyon, the Bible and Qur’an, and Robin Hood ballads. Theoretical readings include Agamben, Freud, Lacan, Zizek, among others. Middle English texts read in original. All other texts read in modern English.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to take EH 207 (or EH 242)/209 before I can take EH 208/210?

No. They can be taken in either order, though you must be enrolled in the Honors College to enroll in either EH 209 or 210. Consult your Program of Study to see if one or both courses are needed.

What if I already completed part of my Area II requirements before these new courses were introduced?

EH 207 (or EH 242) and 208 will substitute for what was previously EH 205, 206, 230, 231, 240, and 241. If you have already taken EH 205, 230, or 240 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 208. If you have already taken EH 206, 231, or 241 and need to complete the sequence, you should register for EH 207 (or EH 242). Similarly, EH 209 and EH 210 will substitute for what was previously EH 250 and 251.

For more information, contact the English Department at eh@uah.edu or 256.824.6320.