UAH

GED

ABOUT THE 2014 GED® TEST

What is the test format?

The test is on computer.

Will the content change drastically from the current 2002 Series GED® Test?

The content of the 2014 GED® test does differ from that tested on the 2002 Series GED® Test. Refer to the resource on our website called “2002 to 2014: A Content Comparison” available at the following link: http://www.gedtestingservice.com/uploads/files/2487f6e1ca5659684cbe1f8b16f564d0.pdf

How long will the GED® test take?

The GED® test will be about 7 hours long with the timing for each module as follows: 

  • Reasoning through Language Arts is 150 minutes (including a 10-minute break)

  • Mathematical Reasoning is 90 minutes

  • Science is 90 minutes

  • Social Studies is 90 minutes

Is keyboarding speed an issue? How does this influence test time?

The time given is adequate for students to construct their answer and key in their response. Field testing has demonstrated that even test-takers with minimal keyboarding skills have adequate time.

Are questions linear or computer adaptive?

Linear.

Will there still be multiple versions (forms) of each subject test?

Yes, as in any high quality standardized testing program, multiple equivalent forms of the test will be administered to test-takers to ensure that test security is maintained and to offer multiple testing opportunities to test-takers who might not pass on their first attempt.

Can students take the same form of the test over again?

The system will have 3 forms of the test and make sure that a student does not take the same form twice. Please Note: Students can re-test on the same form after 60 days of the last test.

STANDARDIZATION, NORMING, AND PASSING STANDARDS

How hard will the test be for older students?

The test is aligned with today's high school standards. It is at the same difficulty level as needed to pass high school today.

Since the test is being normed on high school graduates, will there be much of a difference in passing rates?

The Passing Standard for high school equivalency was set based on the performance of a national sample of high school graduates from the class of 2013.  The cut score for high school equivalency was set at a performance level such that the passing rates on the individual content-area tests are comparable to those that are currently in place for the 2002 Series GED® Test.  The Passing Standard on each content area test has been established at a scaled score of 150 on a scale of 100 to 200.

What is the cut score for passing the GED® test?

The cut score for passing each content area test has been established at a scaled score of 150 on a scale of 100 to 200. More details will be announced in coming weeks.

Where is the norming process?

GED Testing Service will be coming out with a scoring announcement soon.

Any word on scoring cut points for GED® vs. career- and college-ready pass scores?

The cut scores for the GED® with Honors, representing performance consistent with readiness for career and college, were set at a scaled score of 170 on a scale of 100 to 200 for each content area test.  The GED® with Honors cut scores were based the performance of a national sample of high school graduates from the class of 2013 who participated in the Standardization and Norming Study (SNS) in the summer of 2013.

Will the 2250 minimum score still be utilized for passing the GED® test?

No.  The new test will be on an entirely new scale of 100 to 200 points with a Passing Standard of 150 points on each test module.  In 2014, test-takers will need to reach a score of at least 150 on each of the four content modules (Reasoning Through Language Arts, Mathematical Reasoning, Science, and Social Studies) in order to be eligible to receive a high school equivalency credential.  There is no longer compensation between the test modules to offset lower scores on one module with higher scores on another module as there was on the 2002 Series GED® Test. 

Will the new scoring reflect whether or not students are college and/or job-force ready?

Yes.

If 150 equates to high school equivalent, what is the score needed for assessing college/career readiness?

The score needed for career and college readiness has been established at 170 on a scale of 100 to 200 for each subject. This score is based on performance data of a national sample of high school graduates from the class of 2013 who participated in the Standardization and Norming study in the summer of 2013.

Will students from the correctional education setting be included in norming sample this year?

The test was normed on a national sample of high school graduates from the class of 2013.  As such, students from corrections, who are typically adults, were not included in this sample.

The old 450 average is now gone so that a student can no longer build points to make up for a lower test score (420) and still pass the GED test with an average score?

Yes, the scale of the new test is completely different, and there is no compensation of scores between sections of the test.  On the other hand, there is also no expectation that the test-taker needs to score higher than a minimum score to fulfill requirements for the high school equivalency credential.

How will the sample of graduating high school seniors affect scoring exactly?

The norming sample of graduating high school seniors does not affect scoring, it affects the placement of the cut score required to pass each of the modules of the test.

How is the 2014 GED® test scored and what score is passing?

The 2014 GED® test is scored by computer. The passing standard on each module has been set at a score of 150 on a scale of 100 to 200 scaled score points for each of the four content modules.

Why is this shift happening at this time and not in the future when it is more in line with current curriculum?

The shift to the Common Core standards is happening nationwide at the current time.  By shifting the content of the test now, but keeping the passing standard for high school equivalency matched with performance of graduating high school seniors in 2013 who have not yet had instruction in career- and college-ready content, we enable adult test-takers to achieve a high school equivalency diploma on the same basis as their current high school graduate counterparts, and yet provide them with performance feedback and information on their demonstration of skills consistent with readiness for career and college.  This information provides them with guidance that will be useful as they chart their course forward into postsecondary education or the workforce, which will require skills beyond what is currently required for high school equivalency.

REGISTRATION AND SCHEDULING

Do students register online for the new GED® test?

Yes.  Students register online for the GED® test on computer, using the MyGED™ portal at http://www.ged.com.

What will the new registration process consist of?

The registration process for the 2014 GED® test is much simpler. Students are required to sign up for a MyGEDTM account at www.GED.com and then they are able to access the dashboard full of information about studying, test day, scheduling, scoring, and college and career opportunities. When students are eligibile to schedule, they can go log in 24/7 to www.GED.com, click "Start scheduling" on their dashboard, complete the demographic questions, schedue one test or multiple tests at a time, and pay for their appointment. 

Will testers still be able to take one test at a time on different dates?

Yes. Test-takers can test on what they want, when they want, and where they want. This way they feel prepared every time.

 

For more info, visit http://www.gedtestingservice.com/educators/2014-faqs