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Courses

As an interdisciplinary program, the Women's and Gender Studies Minor features one core course, WGS 200 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, offered annually, and multiple additional courses designated as Women's and Gender Studies courses, taught in departments ranging from biology to management to sociology to philosophy. These courses are listed on the UAH course schedule under their major department and carry the marker of "W," which demonstrates that they have been approved by the Women's and Gender Studies Program Advisory Committee as Women's and Gender Studies classes and can be used to fulfill the requirements of the Women's and Gender Studies Minor.

Download the Women's and Gender Studies schedule of courses for the current semester.

Download the Women's and Gender Studies Minor Advising Form.

If you are a faculty member who would like to propose one of your courses for approval as a Women's and Gender Studies course, please contact the Women's and Gender Studies Program Office to discuss your course and get the course proposal form.

For more information about Women's and Gender Studies at UAH, call the Women's and Gender Studies Program office at (256) 824-6190, or e-mail Dr. Molly Johnson, Director of Women's and Gender Studies, at molly.johnson@uah.edu.

You do not need to be a regular student pursuing a degree to take these courses. Call the Admissions Office about Non-Degree status (256-824-6070) or check out the UAH Admissions website.

Women's and Gender Studies Course Descriptions

WGS 200 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies Focusing on gender as a fundamental category of meaning, the course will introduce methods and approaches to Women'sand Gender Studies in a variety of disciplines, examining the pervasive and often unacknowledged ways that gender changes our social institutions, individual knowledge, and interpersonal relationships. The course includes guest lectures by many of the faculty teaching courses in the Women's and Gender Studies minor.

Download the WGS 200 flier for the current semester.

 

Core Courses in Women's and Gender Studies

Humanities:

ARH 320 - Women in Antiquity This multi-disciplinary course looks at the primary source evidence, written and visual, for women's experience in the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. These cultures were largely patriarchal and men created the majority of written and visual evidence for other men. Nonetheless, we can recover a great deal from the extant works of men who wrote about women as well as directly from literate women in all of these cultures. Lives of common women can be assessed through inscriptions, legal documents, and funerary evidence. This course will also explore how ancient men represent and assess women to discover the role of these observations in ancient and modern life. The course is organized chronologically and by culture.

CM 416 - Women Orators (3 hrs) Critical examination of women's public address as it has developed through women's participation in movements for abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and equal rights.

EH 418 - Representative Texts by Women Writers (3 hrs) Focus on women's contribution to the literary tradition. Prerequisites: Course is open to students who have completed the general education requirement in literature or permission of the instructor.

EH 440 - Native Women's Literature (3 hrs) In this course we will explore issues of identity, representation, and experience in texts written by and about Native North American women. We will engage with a broad variety of texts—fiction, literary criticism, ethnography, and native-studies criticisms—in order to consider the politics of demarcating what counts as Native women's literature and what it means to mark a course as concerned with understanding "Native" and "Women."

EH 462 - Shakespeare II (3 hrs) Specialized study of Shakespeare’s works, with particular attention to a given genre, time, period, theme, culture context, and/or critical/theoretical approach. Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature

EH 465 - Dramatic Literature (3 hrs) Studies in Drama and interpretive strategies for reading plays. May be organized nationally, by genre, or by theme/topic. Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature.

HY 367 - Women in U.S. History (3 hrs) Women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Open to students who have completed 9 semester hours in history or have junior standing.

HY 390 - Women in Modern European History (3 hrs) Survey of European women's history from the Enlightenment to the present. Focus on how women have supported, challenged, and revised expected roles for women in different historical contexts, as well as how nationality, social class, and ethnicity have shaped women's lives. Open to students who have completed 9 semester hours in history or have junior standing.

HY 483 - Women and Gender in Latin America (3 hrs)  This course studies the history of women and gender relations in Latin America from the colonial period to the present. Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed 12 semester hours in history or have senior standing or have permission of the instructor.

PHL 335 - Philosophy of Gender (3 hrs) Philosophical examination of the nature and importance of gender. Topics may include: the debate between essentialist and constructionist views of gender, the political importance of gender, the intersection of gender and other forms of identity (such as racial and sexual identity), and basic issues in established fields of feminist epistemology, feminist political theory or feminist ethics. Prerequisites: PHL 101 or permission of instructor.

Social Sciences, Health Sciences, Business and Technology:

MGT 462 - Employment Law for Managers (3 hrs) Analysis of the impact of government regulation on the management of human resources. Examines the implications for employer responsibilities and employee rights of evolving public policies pertaining to separations, discrimination, compensation, occupational safety and health, privacy, union-management relations, and other terms of employment. (See requirements for upper division standing).

NUR 425 - Human Sexuality (3 hrs) Theory and issues related to human sexuality in health and illness. Emphasis on theory and values clarification of human sexuality needs across the lifespan.

PY 406 - Psychology of Women (3 hrs) Examines theory and research in the psychological functioning of women, both in the United States and other nations. Topics include achievement and education, mental and physical health issues, biological influences on women's behavior, women and work, and victimization of women. Open to students who have completed 15 hours of psychology. Senior standing.

SOC 206 - Marriage and Family (3 hrs) The family as a social institution, its structure and function in contemporary societies, dating, marital interaction, life cycle, and socialization process.

SOC 306 - Sociology of Gender (3 hrs) An examination of the different perspectives used in the sociological analysis of gender and of the current research addressing gender stratification. The analysis includes the institutional consequences of gender construction in the United States and cross-culturally, as well as the effects on women and men as members of society.

 

Special Topics courses may be included in this area. Examples include: FL 204 ST: Performing Gender: Exploring Gender Roles and Sexuality in International Cinema; FL404 ST: Hispanic Women Writers. See an advisor for a current list. WS 340 (Special Topics) or WS 499 (Independent Study) may count as core courses if the course carries 3 hours credit (with permission of Director).

WGS 340 - Special Topics (1-3 hrs) Pre-announced special areas addressed in seminar format, laboratory work, or practicum. May be taken twice for credit. Prerequisites: WGS 200.

WGS 499 - Independent Study (1-3 hrs) Readings and/or individual research in an area of specialized interest to both student and instructor. Prerequisites: WGS 200 and permission of instructor.

 

Elective Courses in Women's and Gender Studies

ARH 103 - Art in Non-Western Traditions (3 hrs) Survey of visual culture in India and Southeast Asia, China, Japan and Korea, the Americas, the Pacific, and Africa. Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on relationships among works of art, religious belief systems, political conventions, and cultural practices. Lower division art history courses explore the major monuments of art, ancient through contemporary, in their historical and cultural contexts. These courses introduce the student to the basic analytic tools of art history.

ARH 309 - Contemporary Art and Issues (3 hrs) Major movements since World War II, including Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, Pop, Photorealism, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Earthworks, New Realism, Neo-Expressionism, Performance, and Post-modernism. Special focus is given to the last five years in contemporary art. Upper division art history courses present the art of specific periods in its historical, literary, philosophical, political, and social contexts. This course guides the student in critical reading of selected art historical and interdisciplinary scholarship. Prerequisites: ARH 100 and 101 required for majors and recommended for non-majors.

BYS 318 - Vertebrate Reproduction (3 hrs) General treatment of the major concepts and controversial areas of comparative vertebrate reproduction: ecological and evolutionary aspects, development of reproductive functions and sexual behavior, seasonal breeding and other topics of current interest. Prerequisites: BYS 120 or 313 BYS 219. Prerequisite with concurrency: BYS 300.

BYS 437 - Psychobiology of Stress and Illness (3 hrs) Overview of psychological stress responses and their influence on health, behavior and illness. Prerequisites: 9 hours of BYS or PY or approval of instructor. Same as PY 437.

CM 330 - Nonverbal Communication (3 hrs) Examines the diversity of human nonverbal behavior and its influences on everyday communication experiences. Same as PY 330.

CM 333 - Interpersonal Communication (3 hrs) Examines the process of communication between individuals. Prerequisites: CM 231 or permission of instructor.

CM 433 - The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication (3 hrs) Traditional Interpersonal Communication pedagogy focuses on more of the positive aspects of relationship formation and maintenance. This course offers a more complete view of human relationships by exploring a variety of topics related to the “darker” side of relationships situated in the contexts of friendships, family members, and intimates. By exploring issues such as deception, fatal attraction, jealousy and envy, conflict, stalking, abuse, and many others, students acquire a more complete view of human relationships. Prerequisites: CM 231.

CM 455 - Communication and Culture (3 hrs) This course focuses on the application of theory and research to intercultural communication. Topics and activities assist students in developing communication skills that improve their competence in intercultural situations. By addressing the different world views that shape our perceptions, values, attitudes, and beliefs of different people, the Culture and Communication course challenges students to become aware of cultural differences, avoid ethnocentrism, and work toward effective communication with unalike others. Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

EH 403 - Literary Criticism and Theory (3 hrs) Major texts and approaches from Plato to the present. This course is ordinarily cross-listed with EH 503, a graduate-level course, and will be most appropriate for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature.

EH 430 - The American Novel (3 hrs) In alternate years the course may focus on 19th or 20th century American novels. Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature.

EH 438 - African American Literature (3 hrs) Themes, concepts and imagery in the Black American literary tradition. This course is ordinarily cross-listed with EH 538, a graduate-level course, and will be most appropriate for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature.

EH 497 - Victorian Literature (3 hrs) Representative writing of the Victorian Age (1837-1901), selected from prose, poetry, or fiction, with emphasis on social and cultural changes that inform the literature. Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature.

HY 370 - Social History of American Technology (3 hrs) Explores the history of the interrelationship of people and technology in American history from 1600 to the present. Prerequisites: Open to students who have junior standing or permission of the instructor.

HY 399 - Food in World History (3 hrs) This course is an examination of the role of food in shaping modern history in relation to topics such as religion, politics, commerce, class, gender, race, and national identity. There is a particular emphasis on the interaction of material and cultural factors in shaping what and how we eat. Students will develop an awareness and understanding for the place of food in history and the origins of modern diets and cuisines. Class readings pay particular attention to the way that gender, race, and class shape the politics of food production and consumption.

HY 482 - Comparative Slavery and Abolition (3 hrs) Explore what slavery has meant in different times and places as a way of better understanding this pervasive institution. In this course, students may consider slavery in the ancient world, Indian Ocean, Africa, the United States, and/or other locations over time. The course will cover select topics in comparative methodology. Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed 12 semester hours in history or have senior standing or have permission of the instructor.

HY 485 - Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (3 hrs) Seminar course on the historiography of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. Open to students who have completed 12 semester hours in history or have senior standing or have permission of the instructor.

PHL 102 - Introduction to Ethics (3 hrs) Major ethical positions in both classical and modern thought. The course will include a consideration of case studies drawn from practical contexts in engineering, medicine and other areas.

PHL 438 - Contemporary Political Thought (3 hrs) Systematic study of recent and current thinking on issues and problems of politics, social theory, and ethics with special attention to the philosophical dimension of these issues and problems. Prerequisites: 9 hours PSC, PHL, and/or HY. Same as PSC 438.

PSC 438 - Contemporary Political Thought (3 hrs) Systematic study of recent and current thinking on issues and problems of politics, social theory, and ethics with special attention to the philosophical dimension of these issues and problems. Prerequisites: 9 hours PSC, PHL, and/or HY. Same as PHL 438.

PSC 440 - Regional Studies: African Politics (3 hrs) Using Sub-Saharan African countries as examples, in this course we will review key themes in politics of developing nations. These include an analysis of what defines the 'Third World,' democratization, the politization of ethnic difference, the use of religion in politics, urban and rural development. Throughout, we will consider the inclusion or exclusion of women in politics, and the impact of gender dynamics on policies and political approaches.

PY 330 - Nonverbal Communication (3 hrs) Examines the diversity of human nonverbal behavior and its influences on everyday communication experiences. Same as CM 330.

PY 375 - Social Psychology (3 hrs) Examination of the social influences on both individual and group behavior. Topics may include attitudes, group processes, intergroup conflict, interpersonal attraction, aggression, altruism, and impression formation. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or PY101. Same as SOC 375.

PY 437 - Psychobiology of Stress and Illness (3 hrs) Overview of physiological stress responses and their influence on health behavior and illness. Open to students who have completed 15 hours of psychology. Prerequisites: 9 hours PY or BYS. Same as BYS 437.

SOC 105 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs) Origin and development of human ways of life with emphasis on cross-cultural variations in human behavior, belief systems, social institutions, and cultural change.

SOC 375 - Social Psychology (3 hrs) Fundamental principles of group processes, social influence, and group structure. Development of group solidarity, cohesion, intergroup conflict and cooperation, communication, leadership, opinion, propaganda, and suggestion. Same as PY 375.

SOC 415 - Sociology of Globalization (3 hrs) Critical exploration of the processes of modernization and globalization and their impact on cultures, economies, and environments of developing societies. Topics include history and theories of development and case studies that examine the linkages among gender, class, culture, and development.

SOC 435 - Sociology of Social Movements (3 hrs) This course explores various organized movements for social change. Questions addressed include the origins and causes of such movements, the cultural, social and political contexts that impact movements, how movements mobilize people to become active, and strategies and tactics. Other topics include organizational factors and resource mobilization, social networks, collective identity and community building, social movement framing (i.e. persuasive rhetoric and argumentation), ideology, the decline of movements, and what "success" means for a social movement. Prerequisites: SOC 301 and SOC 303 or permission of instructor.

 

Special Topics may be included in this area. Examples include PHL 403: Advanced Moral Philosophy: Care Ethics. See an advisor for a current list.